Vetsuite Veterinarians
General Practice & Preventative Medicine – Theriogenology

SHOULD YOUR CAT REPRODUCE?

You love your cat dearly and think, wouldn’t the world be a better place if there were more cats just like her or him? However, before you breed your cat, take some time to consider whether or not it is the best thing to do and whether you are doing it for the right reasons. Make this decision carefully and only after a lot of research and talking with experienced breeders.

Breeding cats is not as simple as it sounds. To safeguard the health of your cat and his or her offspring, you need to be able to handle any situation you encounter. Ask yourself the following questions:

· Do you have the time to dedicate to breeding? The time you will need to spend with your new kittens will increase dramatically.

· Will you be able to afford the costs involved in vaccinating and deworming the kittens?

· If you can’t find new homes for the new babies, are you willing to keep them? This means more feeding and more cleaning. Remember you started with one cat; you may end up with a total of six to eight or even more.

THE WRONG REASONS

One of the worst things you could do would be to breed your cat for the wrong reasons. Each year about 17 million dogs and cats are turned over to animal shelters. Out of every 10 that were taken in, only one finds a home. Of the rest, some 13.5 million must be destroyed.

The suffering and sorrow associated with pet overpopulation is overwhelming. And yet, much of it could be eliminated by breeding only for the right reasons.

Some of the wrong reasons:

· You want to breed because kittens are soooooo cute. Keep in mind they will grow up quickly and may be not be so cute anymore. What will you do then?

· You want to let your kids experience the miracle of birth. Unfortunately, the whelping process has usually been completed by the time you realize it and everyone has missed “the miracle.”

· You want to breed so that you can sell the kittens. Unless you are serious about promoting a particular breed, it is unlikely that buyers will knock at your door to buy. Even if you choose to breed a particular breed, you will likely not make a significant profit.

THE RIGHT REASONS

To be a responsible breeder, consider every aspect before proceeding. For the best experience, remember that every cat has physical and emotional needs. Also realize that If you are going to breed, it should only be done for the right reasons.

The best reason to breed your cat is to promote a particular breed. There are plenty of mixed breed cats in the world, and breeding should only be done after careful consideration and discussion with experienced breeders. Only top quality members of a breed should be used. You should also make sure you have homes for all the potential kittens, even before breeding.

If, after plenty of soul searching, you have decided to breed your cat, remember that giving away those kittens can be difficult. Not everyone will provide a suitable home. You will need to interview prospective buyers and ask them about the purpose of having the cat, the set-up for the cat, their lifestyle (for instance, if they travel a lot, who will be the caretaker) and whether they have the time, patience and tools to care for their new family member properly.

If the answers tell you that this person is a suitable mama/papa, a new home is found. If not, you will have to turn down the sale regardless how much money is involved.

Remember no one can decide whether or not to breed your cat but you. After much consideration, you should make the best decision for your family and for your cat.

Dear Valued Clients

During these challenging times, there have been some unforeseen changes at The Big Easy Animal Hospital. I cannot express enough my sincere apology for any inconvenience you have experienced at The Big Easy during these times. As we strive to make the practice safe to protect everyone including you, your family, and our Big Easy team and their families, I’ve decided to make certain changes while we are under this pandemic. These changes will be temporary.

 

Monday through Friday:

Walk Ins start at 10:00am, check-in starts at 9:00am.There are a limited amount of patients we can accept. Our receptionists will be happy to assist you with options to help guide you and your pet(s).)

 

Starting Saturday, August 1st

Saturdays will be TECHNICIAN APPOINTMENTS only. These will include boosters, bloodwork, nail trims, certain diagnostics, etc. There will not be a veterinarian on site. While I understand these changes can be inconvenient, I have listed local veterinary clinics that we have contacted and are open to see walk-ins throughout the week and Saturdays as well. For life threatening emergencies that occur outside business hours, please contact the following 24-hour animal hospitals below.

Please, be safe and healthy.

Thank you all for your understanding. -Aileen Ruiz, DVM

 

24 Hour Emergency Care:

 

Pittsburgh Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center

807 Camp Horne Road
Pittsburgh, PA
(412)366-3400

 

AVETS

4224 Northern Pike
Monroeville, PA
(412)373-4200


VCA Castle Shannon Animal Hospital

3610 Library Road
Pittsburgh, PA
(412)885-2500


Veterinarians Accepting Walk in Care:

Penn Animal Hospital

2205 Penn Avenue
(412)471-9855
WALK—IN’S—MONDAY THRU FRIDAY from 10:00 AM – 1:30 PM


North Boros Veterinary Hospital

2255 Babcock Blvd
(412)821-5600
WALK-IN’S—MONDAY THRU FRIDAY from 9:00 AM – 12:30 PM

 

 

Contact Us

You have Successfully Subscribed!